Help understanding 3-part electric meter reading – Miscellaneous – Expats Portugal Community Forum
Help understanding ...
 
Share:
Notifications
Clear all

Please feel free to view our Forum, but you must either LOGIN or REGISTER to join in the conversation.

Sovereign Group Leaderboard

Help understanding 3-part electric meter reading


Posts: 11
Community Member
Topic starter
(@nickj1)
Active Member
Joined: 1 month ago

Good morning, can someone help to understand the electricity meter readings from an apartment please and a way to estimate the cost?  The agent who handled the rental has been uncooperative and left my relative who I'm asking this for, with no way to understand what the electric costs should be.

The meter display alternates between three bands, that appear to be called 1-8-1, 1-8-2 and 1-8-3.  I'm guessing that they are peak/off-peak bands, but it isn't clear.

The total usage that has been incurred are:

1-8-1 Units used : 244

1-8-2 Units used : 180

1-8-3 Units used : 421

Can anyone enlighten us please, or offer advice?  Thanks.

 

5 Replies

Posts: 1771
VIP Member
(@old-bloke)
Noble Member
Joined: 12 years ago

You are correct, they are units of lecky used in each of the 3 different time (pricing) periods, even if you're not on the tri-hour or bi-hour tariff it will display all 3 so you can work out if it is worthwhile changing to a different tariff.
I don't know the prices for the off-peak units but if you work to 20 cents a unit (the standard rate) you will get a rough idea of what sort of bill to expect.
To work out your usage you would need to know what the reading was on the last bill.

Reply
1 Reply
Community Member
(@nickj1)
Joined: 1 month ago

Active Member
Posts: 11

Thank you @old-bloke that's very useful.  Thankfully he recorded the meter readings in photographs on the date of moving in/out and those were the units I mentioned (total 845).  It seems the electric cost at the new apartment he's moved to (for which the owner is passing on the bills as she should do) is approximately 30 cents per unit with tax added, so anyway perhaps a figure between that and the figure you mention.  We can't really tell what the charging basis was at the old place.

But in so far as the previous apartment was concerned, the agent seemed to want to avoid making it clear how the costs were to be calculated.  She has never provided the bills she agreed to send, and thus avoids returning his deposit.  There is a lack of clarity in other words.  It may be of benefit to others on this forum, that it might be a known practice to make it difficult to return the deposit.

Incidentally, the electric bills here seem extraordinarily complex, with several accompanying full pages of additional columns and rows of figures broken down into small amounts.  I'm astonished there are so many figures relating to what ought to be just a 'start' and 'end' meter reading.

Reply

Posts: 1286
VIP Member
(@richardhenshall)
Noble Member
Joined: 12 years ago

1.8.1 - energia de vazio (off-peak/night-time, only applies to bi-horário tariff - otherwise charged as 1.8.3)
1.8.2 - energia de ponta (peak rate, only applies to tri-horário tariff - otherwise charged as 1.8.3)
1.8.3 - energia de cheias (normal/daytime)

 

If you are on a time-of-day metering tariff there are two versions - a daily cycle and a weekly cycle - which have different time bands.  In exchange for cheaper off-peak units the rate for peak and normal are higher.  It is possible to have a bi-horário tariff that could be more expensive overall than a simples (flat rate) tariff, depending on your pattern of consumption.

You really need to see the bill to know what the costs are.

Reply
2 Replies
Community Member
(@nickj1)
Joined: 1 month ago

Active Member
Posts: 11

Thanks also for the reply @richardhenshall it's useful.  Yes, I agree with your point that the bill is relevant.  For the purpose of settling the cost of the electricity however, as agreed at the outset with the agent, it's probably not much of an issue to us whether it's a night tariff or a normal tariff that the apartment owner has in place.  Rather, just having a way to reasonably settle 30 cents/unit and receive the deposit back again, would be better than nothing.

As things stand, the agent knows there's a residual balance left over from the deposit, which is quite a bit higher than the electricity cost.  I suspect that some owners find it a good source of extra income, that short-term renters never get to see the actual bill.  It was never made very clear to him in the beginning and at one point, she said she was going to send him the bill the following week, but it never happened.

Thanks again.

Reply
VIP Member
(@richardhenshall)
Joined: 12 years ago

Noble Member
Posts: 1286

@nickj1, I thought it was supposed to be illegal to re-sell electricity at a higher price, though that may only apply for long term rental.

Reading and understanding electricity bills is not for everyone!  There is a daily standing charge, depending on the maximum contracted power, of up to approx €1.00 per day, a fixed contribution for a TV licence and the cost of energy consumed, which can include adjustments for previous estimates or previous prices (at this time of year prices seem to change twice in Jan/Feb).  The rate of IVA charged is also reducing from 23% at different times for different people.

Reply

To post a reply, sign up and become a member!

Premium

By becoming a valued Premium Member today, your support will help the team continue to bring you useful content about life in Portugal. You can also:

JOIN TODAYOnly €25 per year
Share:

Free

Sign me up as a Community Member today for access to the forum and social meet-ups.

SIGN UP

Premium

The first year’s donation is only €47 with a 50% discount every year you continue to renew your membership. By becoming a valued Premium Member today, you will unlock some great privileges, freebies and perks.

Less than €4 per monthJoin Today

Copyright © 2021 Expats Portugal

Marketing by Unity Online