A warm house in Portugal? - Page 4 – Property & Real Estate – Expats Portugal Community Forum
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A warm house in Portugal?

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Posts: 105
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Topic starter
(@portofakiwi)
Estimable Member
Joined: 4 years ago

Another damp cold winter almost over, and no more for me in my current house. It's just too cold and damp, bad heating in only two rooms and damp and unpleasant.

However I can't find a house to buy after a few years of looking as it doesn't seem to be possible to buy a house with good insulation, and all room heating that actually works where you can get 23 degrees inside on a winter night. (For a reasonable price - and semi rural, no close neighbours etc)

If you have a warm toasty house can you please let me know as I'm losing hope!

48 Replies

Posts: 191
Ask Our Expats Consultant
(@thomasribatejo)
Member
Joined: 4 years ago

@jeanne

Avoidance of dew point (the point at which water vapour turns to liquid) on wall surfaces is one of the purposes of ETICS, eliminating thermal bridges.  Therefore, there should be no situation in which water condenses within the system.

Whilst there seem to be commonalities between ETICS and EIFS, they are not the same system, and are likely to be applied to different building types.  We have not encountered EIFS here in Portugal.

In terms of government grants/tax benefits, yes, there are a variety - dependent on what you are doing and where you are doing it.  These can relate to areas prioritised for urban rehabilitation (so, broadly, restoring buildings in designated areas); or to energy saving/green initiatives - and a combination may be possible.  Whilst the underlying legal bases are national, the precise details can vary from year to year, and from municipality to municipality.

 

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Community Member
(@jeanne)
Joined: 8 months ago

Estimable Member
Posts: 131

@thomasandmatthew. Dew point issues arise here more often when interior (often basement) walls have been insufficiently or incorrectly insulated. Our basements are cement block, and the surrounding ground can freeze in winter to 6 foot depth; too little insulation means the d point can fall on the exterior side of the insulation. I would think that this same situation can arise w interior wall insulation in stone or block construction in PT?

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Ask Our Expats Consultant
(@thomasribatejo)
Joined: 4 years ago

Member
Posts: 191

@jeanne

ETICS is an exterior solution, so we're getting into different territory here, with different solutions required for internal walls (even without the extreme temperatures you experience!) 

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