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What does it mean "Floor of House"  


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(@gwritejill)
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Looking at rental houses. After translation, some say "Floor of House"

Is it Google translate getting this wrong or what does that mean?

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(@anavieira)
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Joined: 6 months ago

don’t know exactly the original word in portuguese. If you have the word in Portuguese i can help you.

Without knowing, i can only imagine that it means that is a house with 2 floors and you are renting just one of them. Imagine a house with ground floor and 1st floor, two separate entrances. You are renting or buying just one of them. 
Meaning you may be in a detached house but you will have neigbours sharing the house.

That is very common in Portugal. Usually family houses, parents and children, brothers and sisters, etc, and when one of them move away, they rent the place.

Hope that helps 🙂

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(@cabanastavira)
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Joined: 9 months ago

@gwritejill - if the Pt word you are translating is chão it refers to the ground floor of a house. Does this help?

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(@gwritejill)
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So that means it's a house, and the part you get is one floor of the house? The owner, or someone else, lives on the other floor(s)?

 

One example says, "Andar de Mordia" 

 

Thank you!

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(@anavieira)
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@gwritejill

Andar de moradia is exactly that. You live in one floor of a house and you have neighbours on the other floor. it can be the owner or other tenant

🙂

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(@cabanastavira)
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@gwritejill - yes, that sounds right to me.

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Posts: 9
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(@gwritejill)
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Just to make sure I have all these terms correct: 

Terraced House - no one else lives above or below you, the sides of the houses are connected to the next house. 

Detached House - the house is not connected to another house, but it may be renting one floor or all floors of the house

Floor of House - means you are renting one floor of a house, with owner or renters on the other floors

Flat - an apartment

Duplex - an apartment with two or more stories (floors). There may be apartments above or below you. 

Villa - same as detached house?

Is that right?

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(@anavieira)
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@gwritejill

Terrace House -  for me is a house with a terrace. No information about being side by side walls with another house. My undesrtanding is that is called a semi-detached house. (casa geminada - name in portuguese)

Detached house (moradia) - you rent or buy all the house, all the space.

Floor of House (andar de moradia) - you buy/rent one floor of a house where there are people living the other floor - owner or other tenant.

Flat (apartamento) - yes, correct

Duplex - (duplex also in portuguese) - yes, correct

Villa - (villa also in portuguese) - like detached house but usually more luxury or maybe in a condominium with several villas.

(by the way, vila with only one L means small village)

 

Hope that helps!

If you have more questions, send me the words in Portuguese 🙂 

🙂

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(@cabanastavira)
Joined: 9 months ago

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In England a terraced house is as @gwritejill says but equally in Pt @AnaVieria has a point. Townhouses in England are often equivalent to terraced houses ie connected to each other. You certainly find 'townhouses' in Pt, especially in 'urbanizations'. I agree with your other definitions though @gwritejill.

Maybe best to talk to the Estate Agent (Realtor) to clarify their meaning (and translation)?

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(@x-camone)
Joined: 11 years ago

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"em banda" is also often used to describe conjoined properties.

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(@cabanastavira)
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@x-camone Nao sei, obrigado 😀

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